The Young and the Restless / family-company-business Summary, Thursday December 15, 2017 / s46, episode 74

The writing on the Young and the Restless has become quick, focused, sharp, bold over this last 12 years of massive socially sensitive issues.

The phrase “my favorite mistake” in American English simply means- “I failed in an endeavor. However, by failing I was freed up and a much better situation presented itself. ”

Sheryl Crow’s My Favorite Mistake is a brilliant lyric on its own. It reads as well as a poem as a song. Good fun drama.

The song is fantastic, as the bass line sounds like classic Rolling Stones or Tho Who or The Pretenders. That said, the lyric in the song,

Young and the Restless has gotten crisp and brilliant. The writing has improved so much over the past 12 years I stand and applaud adjusting to social situations of extreme sensitivity with equanimity.

“Don’t you know when you go

It’s the perfect ending,

To the bad day,

I’d gotten used to spending.

Don’t you know,

When you go you’re my favorite mistake.”

That high level of sardonic conversation was reflected perfectly as character Jack Abbott and Nikki Newman on season 46, episode 74.

Sheryl Crow best bass-line groove? “My Favorite Mistake” | modern tempo probability charts copyrighted yet unclassified

Norm was inside the inside the business. He had a word of wisdom in regard to *any* good piece of music, especially popular songs:

“The song has *got* to have a different, new bass-line.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The best co-writer I ever worked with was Norman Dozier. Real name.

Norm was inside the inside the business. He had a word of wisdom in regard to *any* good piece of music, especially popular songs:

“The song has *got* to have a different, new bass-line.”

Who am I to ever question Norman? I cannot say enough about the positive influence he had on me and New York City in general. I especially thank the organist Mollie Nichols for introducing me to and arranging the playing of new music written mostly by me.

So said: the orchestration was all Norm, and the orchestration of our version of Psalm 113 squeaked in the morning service with Bach, Vaughn Williams and others I have no right to name drop. Norm helped fit our hymn in the genre of modern classical. I have total respect for the rock n roll night services and the amplifiers and drums and keyboard samples – anything that flies your plane – but not at a Sunday morning 10:30 Episcopal service – for my taste.

What do you think of this song?

 

Thanks!

/dm/

%d bloggers like this: