The Beatles | Here Comes The Sun | Declassified tempo map

While working on the patent, I was asked by the government for $350 to keep a trademarked name on which I had made no money. I hadn’t tried to make money – that wasn’t the point of the trademark.

This is a chart that was not classified, then after my brain aneurysm I realized my images were disorganized and some that were unclassified had become part of a patent.

While working on the patent, I was asked by the government for $350 to keep a trademarked name on which I had made no money. I hadn’t tried to make money – that wasn’t the point of the trademark.

Anyway, I let it lapse. After the aneurysm, my priorities didn’t change very much insofar as my wanted to show how the speeds of the classic pop-rock songs were played. I make sure these charts are accurate.

Never do I fool myself that the speed is way third in importance to the melody and the harmony, and even the timbre. That said, the simplicity of what I noticed to be patterns have yet to be acknowledged by anyone with a real name in a real place.

Here Comes The Sun by the Beatles is one of the most difficult measurements I have done, with only “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “Stairway To Heaven” more difficult.

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Sheryl Crow best bass-line groove? “My Favorite Mistake” | modern tempo probability charts copyrighted yet unclassified

Norm was inside the inside the business. He had a word of wisdom in regard to *any* good piece of music, especially popular songs:

“The song has *got* to have a different, new bass-line.”

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The best co-writer I ever worked with was Norman Dozier. Real name.

Norm was inside the inside the business. He had a word of wisdom in regard to *any* good piece of music, especially popular songs:

“The song has *got* to have a different, new bass-line.”

Who am I to ever question Norman? I cannot say enough about the positive influence he had on me and New York City in general. I especially thank the organist Mollie Nichols for introducing me to and arranging the playing of new music written mostly by me.

So said: the orchestration was all Norm, and the orchestration of our version of Psalm 113 squeaked in the morning service with Bach, Vaughn Williams and others I have no right to name drop. Norm helped fit our hymn in the genre of modern classical. I have total respect for the rock n roll night services and the amplifiers and drums and keyboard samples – anything that flies your plane – but not at a Sunday morning 10:30 Episcopal service – for my taste.

What do you think of this song?

 

Thanks!

/dm/